Spark of Revival in Perilous Times

Spark of Revival

Council of the Lord Series #2

In this series, I’m sharing things I’ve received through prophetic journaling from the council of the Lord. This is the message I transcribed on August 3, 2018.

My son, we have sent you into the earth to speak of the glories of the Kingdom. To speak the secrets of the Kingdom do those who have ears to hear.

We share with our servants the prophets those things that God desires to bring to pass in the earth, that people may be prepared and those who love His appearing may know ahead of time that which is about to [happen].

We will speak through you. We will draw you. We will anoint you. We will give you the voice and the platform by which to speak these messages. Know that we are preparing messages to bring to the earth for such a time as this—to prepare those for what is about to come, both good and evil.

We desire to spark revival upon the earth, that people may turn to the Lord, that times of refreshing may come, and that you may receive the presence of the Lord, and that the Kingdom may be established in the hearts of men, women, and children.

Times are perilous; perilous times will come also. We desire that you be prepared for these and that you help rescue those from the kingdom of darkness, that they may escape judgments that come about on the earth.

We will prepare you, we will speak to you, we will draw you into our presence. Continue to see yourself here. Continue to envision yourself in our presence. We will take what you offer, and then we will step in and empower it with vision from on high and the word of the Lord.

We will confirm to you our message so that you know that you are hearing from the council of God.

We have much that we would share. We desire that you tune in and that you practice, so that you may be able to receive this communication and be prepared to share it with others.

If this word witnesses with you, please leave a comment. I’ll post more prophecy from the council of the Lord soon.

Midnight Prophetic Call

bible

On November 17, 1989, I experienced something I’ll never forget.

At the time, I was a new Christian, recently baptized in the Holy Spirit. I’d been doing prophetic journaling, listening to the voice of God and transcribing it for three months.

Soon after I fell asleep that night, I was dramatically awakened by a spiritual presence. Was it God? Jesus? An angel? I didn’t know.

I felt impressed—no, strongly led—downstairs where the streetlight shone through the living room windows onto the hardwood floor.

I opened my Bible there and definitely felt directed to the first chapter of the prophet Daniel.

It was as if an unseen angel stood over my shoulder and highlighted the words of the following passage:

To these four young men God gave knowledge and understanding of all kinds of literature and learning. And Daniel could understand visions and dreams of all kinds.
—Daniel 1:17 NIV

Daniel 1:17I say “as if,” but I now believe this is exactly what happened: An angel woke me, led me downstairs, and pointed out this verse as a prophetic calling of my spiritual purpose and destiny. I still remember the powerful presence that overshadowed me.

It has taken 30 years, but this message is finally coming to pass.

I’ve studied and practiced all kinds of writing. I earned a BA in English, a master’s in biblical studies, a master’s in genre fiction writing, been employed as a technical writer in the software industry since 1986, written many short stories and six novels, and read hundreds of books about prophecy, prophets, and ministering the gifts of the Holy Spirit. I pastored a house church for three years. I’ve attended many workshops and conferences and taken classes on prophetic ministry.

In 2007 I experienced a profound spiritual awakening, another in 2016, and am continuing to apply my abilities to pursuing my prophetic call.

If you are diligent to learn and practice the things you are uniquely interested in, one day they may pave the way for you to fulfill your destiny.

May God reveal His call to you and enable you to fulfill it for the glory of His Kingdom.

Secret Council of the Lord

Council of the Lord

Council of the Lord Series #1

There is a place in the heavenly realm where the Lord discusses his secret counsel with confidants—angelic beings; departed saints; and prophets, the friends of the Lord.

But which of them has stood in the council of the Lord to see or to hear his word? Who has listened and heard his word?
–Jeremiah 23:18 NIV

What is the council of the Lord?

The word council is sôd in Hebrew, meaning, “a session, i.e., a company of persons in close deliberation; by implication intimacy, consultation, a secret: assembly, counsel” (Strong’s, H5475).

Sôd is translated as “secret” nine times out of its twenty-one occurrences in the Old Testament.

The council is a confidential assembly of beings who listen to the counsel of the Lord.

The primary meaning of the word is “confidential speech”…, hence, “counsel” (TWOT, 1471a). The GNT translates it “the Lord’s secret thoughts.” The JUB puts it, “For who has stood in the secret of the LORD and has seen and heard his word?”

Eliphaz asked Job,

8 Do you listen in on God’s council? Do you limit wisdom to yourself?
9 What do you know that we do not know? What insights do you have that we do not have?
–Job 15:8-9 NIV

God’s secret counsel must be “listened in on.” It communicates God’s wisdom, information, and insights that others do not know.

The wise and upright person who walks in the fear of the Lord will be privy to God’s secret counsel. See Ps. 25:14; Prov. 3:32; Amos 3:7; Job 29:4. Angels, seraphim, and cherubim are among the Lord’s council.

Besides heavenly beings, there are human servants of the Lord who have special access to the sôd of God.

Amos 3:7 states that “Surely the Sovereign Lord does nothing without revealing his plan to his servants the prophets” (NIV). The EXB translates it as “Before the Lord God does anything, he tells his plans to his servants the prophets.” Many Bible versions translate plans as “secrets,” sôd.

Before doing anything on the earth, God shares his secret plans with his servants, the prophets.

The council of the holy ones

5 The heavens praise your wonders, Lord, your faithfulness too, in the assembly of the holy ones.
6 For who in the skies above can compare with the Lord? Who is like the Lord among the heavenly beings?
7 In the council of the holy ones God is greatly feared; he is more awesome than all who surround him.
–Psalm 89:5-7 NIV

God is surrounded with holy spiritual beings who greatly fear him. He is the most awesome among them all.

  • “Who among the gods is like you, Lord? Who is like you—majestic in holiness, awesome in glory, working wonders?” (Ex. 15:11 NIV)
  • “God presides in the great assembly; he renders judgment among the ‘gods’” (Ps. 82:1 NIV).
  • “Among the gods there is none like you, Lord; no deeds can compare with yours” (Ps. 86:8 NIV).

This council of holy ones meets in heavenly places—paradise (see 2 Cor. 12:2-4), perhaps before the throne of God—to discuss the secret plans of the Lord. Daniel 7:9-10 describe the Lord’s throne and a court assembled before Him to hear his counsel.

“Micaiah continued, “Therefore hear the word of the Lord: I saw the Lord sitting on his throne with all the multitudes of heaven standing around him on his right and on his left” (1 Kings 22:19 NIV).

Accessing the council of the Lord

How do prophets and other righteous followers of the Lord attend this counsel in the heavenlies? By being taken there.

Apostle John wrote, “On the Lord’s Day I was in the Spirit…” (Rev. 1:10 NIV), and “After this I looked, and there before me was a door standing open in heaven. And the voice I had first heard speaking to me like a trumpet said, “Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this” (Rev. 4:1 NIV).

Isaiah was swept up to the throne of God in a vision: “In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted, seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple” (Isa. 6:1 NIV).

A number of times Ezekiel was escorted in the spirit to see things transpire: “He stretched out what looked like a hand and took me by the hair of my head. The Spirit lifted me up between earth and heaven and in visions of God he took me to Jerusalem” (Ezek. 8:3a NIV).

Paul was caught up to the third heaven, although he did not know whether it was in the physical body or only in the spirit (2 Cor. 12:2).

Interacting with the council of the Lord

The primary purpose of attending the council of the Lord is to hear and see what God is communicating and to share it with those on earth.

Carlton Kenney, in his excellent booklet, Standing in the Council of the Lord, states: “While on these trips those servants of God not only saw and observed, but also interacted with the scene before them. This occurred in such a way as to even affect the outcome of the events” (32).

This is the ultimate place of intercession. We have access to the secret council of the Lord and can not only listen in on discussions and decisions made there, but intercede as Abraham and Moses did for the fate of others on the earth.

Isaiah stands before the throne, and after a seraph touches a coal to his lips, this transpires:

8 Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for US?”
And I said, “Here am I. Send me!”
9 He said, “Go and tell this people:”
–Isaiah 6:8-9a NIV

Among the council of the mighty, the sôd of the Lord, God asks who will go and speak for them. Isaiah volunteers, and God accepts his offer!

The purpose of Isaiah’s participation in the council of the Lord was to hear and heed God’s command to speak to God’s people.

Although Paul heard things in the council of the Lord he was not permitted to tell (2 Cor. 12:4), Isaiah and other prophets were commanded and commissioned to share what they heard. Why? Because “Before the Lord God does anything, he tells his plans to his servants the prophets” (Amos 3:7 EXB).

And what is a prophet’s job? To declare the word of the Lord (Deut. 5:5; 1 Kings 13:32).

This is why God told Abraham his plans for Sodom: “The Lord said, ‘Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do?’” (Gen. 18:17 NIV). He did not hide it; He divulged his secret counsel to His friend and prophet, resulting in Abraham’s intercession and the deliverance of Lot’s family.

Sharing the council of the Lord

On July 9, 2018, I was listening to the Lord, journaling His inner voice, and this is what He said:

My son, we are calling you up higher. We desire that you come up and be where we are. Seek things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God, and we will draw you here.

Know that your intention and your imagination will play a part in this transportation. Know that we will begin to do this as you apply yourself to being here.

God invited me to attend His council in the heavenlies. I asked the Lord how I could get started. The Spirit said:

See yourself in the council of the mighty, surrounded by those who would counsel you and give you direction and guidance.

On August 4, 2018, the Lord said:

My son, we are going before you to prepare the way for you to speak the message, even the word of the Lord. For we desire you to take your instructions from this council and that you share with others that which we share with you.

We will give you the word, we will give you the message, we will give you the confirmation, and we desire that you speak this word in humility yet in boldness, for we are able to bring it to pass.

And you will not be the only one speaking this word, but there will be others who speak it. And it will be confirmed here, and it will be confirmed there. It will be taken up, it will be taught on, and in this way the word of the Lord will be revealed to the Body to guide and to direct and to instruct and to encourage, to inform, and to fortify. For we desire that the Body of Christ be ready to do the will of the Lord and to build the Kingdom.

We will release you with Kingdom power. We will release you with a Kingdom word. We will release to you a word not only for the Church, but for the Body yet to be. We will give you a word that draws others unto the Kingdom. Know that as we reveal our secret plans to you and to others, that we will draw those unto the Kingdom that they may become like Christ, become part of the Church, and to become Kingdom builders and spreaders.

I’m planning a series of experiments, although not without some trepidation.

As I apply myself to attending the council of the Lord, I will share what I hear and see here on my blog. It will be tagged in the category “Council of the Lord.”

If you encounter similar messages from others or through what the Spirit is saying to you, please comment and include links, if any.

Until then, God bless you, and may He share His secrets with you for good!

Conclusion of the Sodom Series and Challenge

God Hates Fags

Sodom Series, #16

We see from a study of the Scriptures—all the passages which mention Sodom—that the sins of the cities of the Plain are idolatry, pride, gluttony, violence, hatred of strangers, and inhospitality to outsiders—not same-sex coupling.

When we compare Genesis 19 with the Judges 19 account of Gibeah, we understand that rape—the dehumanization of one human being by another—is the ultimate expression of their hostility and violence toward strangers, whether male or female.

We must study the Scriptures thoroughly before forming doctrine

A thorough study of the Scriptures, as this series has provided, should suffice to determine what the sins of Sodom were. This is especially important when we use the Bible to form doctrine about Christian living while we ignorantly flirt with the danger of condemning entire classes of people.

Christian teaching should speak only what the Scriptures teach. It should conform its logic and argument to that contained in the Scriptures. Most importantly, it should remain silent when the Scriptures are silent. Mark Jordan asks:

Do we meet these tests when we invoke the history of Christian moral teaching to speak about what we call homosexuality? Our readings in medieval texts have suggested that we do not meet them. Indeed, we fail much lesser tests. We typically disregard the most basic rules of respectful reading when arguing about same-sex love. We rip words out of context; we magnify what is microscopic and ignore what is enormous; we refuse to examine the rifts that divide our languages, our discourses, from the patristic or medieval discourses we want to invoke. (The Invention of Sodomy in Christian Theology, 160)

The Apostle Peter admits that some things in Scripture are hard to understand, “which untaught and unstable people twist to their own destruction, as they do also the rest of the Scriptures” (2 Pet. 3:16b NKJV). We therefore must be diligent to correctly interpret and apply its teachings.

This wrenching of the Scriptures leads to the dangerous process of demonization.

Demonization of sodomy

The crimes of the destroyed ancient cities changed from the original scriptural understanding to focus solely on one type of sexual behavior. From there, the term sodomy was coined and abstracted to refer to homosexual behavior and then to homosexuality in general.

“The last thing we should do is to translate ‘Sodomy’ as ‘homosexuality.’ ‘Homosexuality’ is a term from late nineteenth-century forensic medicine, a diagnostic term for regulating the behavior of the patients or prisoners it presumes to classify. If you ask, What does medieval moral theology have to say about homosexuality? the only precise answer is, absolutely nothing. ‘Homosexuality’ is no more discussed by medieval theology than are phlogiston, Newton’s inertia, quarks or any of the other entities hypothesized by one or another modern science. ‘Sodomy’ is not ‘homosexuality’(Jordan 161, emphasis mine).

“There are two separate mistakes here,” Jordan points out. “The first is to think that the story of Sodom is centrally about same-sex pleasure—or even a particular kind of same-sex copulation. It is not” (162). Yet, a great segment of the Church believes that all homosexuals are sodomites, worthy of a fiery death sentence.

The citizens of Sodom lumped together all outsiders as strangers, suspicious as a class and worthy to be abused and violated. They condemned visiting travelers to certain victimhood in every case. Just as nothing good could come from Nazareth, nothing good could come from outside the walls of Sodom.

Tom Horner discusses this process of demonization:

It is doubly unfortunate that a great portion of the public identifies all homosexuality with the conduct of the men of Sodom and says, “The men of Sodom were bad; therefore all homosexuality is bad.” Well, the men of Sodom were bad, but they were bad not because of their homosexuality but because they had allowed themselves to become so callous in their dealings with other human beings that they had turned themselves into brutes. (Jonathan Loved David, 47, emphasis mine)

Those who name Jesus Christ as their Savior and claim to live according to the Bible must see that such disregard and mistreatment of people, even if they’re considered “sinners,” is unquestionably unchristian and bring reproach upon not only the gospel message, but the Lord himself.

When we, in our own relationships, disregard other human beings as persons, we kill them little by little.

Who are the real sodomites?

It is ironic that for almost two thousand years in Western culture this is how people have been treated who’ve been honest enough with themselves to accept homosexuality as a given fact of their existence. They’ve been treated as less than human for no other reason than because they have expressed a sexual preference for members of their own sex.

If we would begin to judge people as individual persons, instead of prejudging them on the basis of their sexual prefer¬ence, maybe we would begin to see where the real propensity for violence and lawbreaking in our society lies. (Horner 57)

McNeill aptly states an irony: for 1000 years in the Christian West, homosexuals have been the recipients of inhospitable treatment. “Condemned by the Church, they have been the victims of persecution, torture, and even death” (Taking a Chance on God, 42).

There’s a sad irony about the story of Sodom when understood in its own historical setting. People oppose and abuse homosexual men and women for being different, odd, strange or, as they say, “queer.”

Lesbian women and gay men are simply not allowed to fit in. They are made to be outsiders, foreigners in their own society.

They are disowned by their families, separated from their children, fired from their jobs, evicted from apartments and neighborhoods, insulted by public figures, denounced from the pulpit, vilified on religious radio and TV, and then beaten in the schools and killed on the streets and in the backwoods of our “great,” “freedom-loving” nation. And all this is done in the name of Christ.

Such wickedness is the very sin of which the people of Sodom were guilty. Such cruelty is what the Bible truly condemns over and over again. So those who oppress homosexuals because of the supposed “sin of Sodom” may themselves be the real “sodomites,” as the Bible understands it. (Helminiak 49–50, emphasis mine)

Being gay is not the unpardonable sin

In some parts of the Church, there is neither mercy nor forgiveness for those who identify themselves as homosexual. “Sodomy,” says Jordan, “seems to be an unrepentable sin… an exception to divine grace…” (Jordan 162). However, there is only one unpardonable sin: blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Mark 3:29; Luke 12:11).

Yet God’s promise to those who are hospitable to strangers, those who accept the outsider and the gospel messenger remains:

I will restore their fortunes, the fortunes of Sodom and her daughters and the fortunes of Samaria and her daughters, and I will restore your own fortunes along with theirs…
–Ezekiel 16:53 NRSV

What will you do?

Two final questions:

  • What will you do to combat the ignorance and misinformation of the Church toward LGBTQ people?
  • How will you treat the stranger in our midst?

The Judge of All the Earth awaits your answer. Jesus said, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand,” and, “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

More information:

The Sin of Sodom coverTo read the full story, get my book, The Sin of Sodom: What the Bible Really Says About Why God Destroyed the Cities of the Plain, for Kindle and in trade paperback.

All the Sins of Sodom

Sins of Sodom

Where does the story of Sodom and Gomorrah leave us? We see that inhospitality, violence, and abuse toward strangers was their primary sin—not homosexuality.

But what about the rest of the Scriptures that mention the cities of the Plain?

In all of the biblical passages, we find the following sins and crimes delineated:

Bible Book Sins akin to Sodom’s
Genesis 13:13; 19 Wickedness and sin
Inhospitality
Forcefulness
Prejudice against outsiders
Disrespect
Cruelty
Violence and physical/sexual abusiveness
Intent to degrade, debase, dominate and humiliate
Deuteronomy 29:17-28; 32:32-35 Detestable practices
Idolatry
Apostasy
Spiritual adultery
Abandoning God
Scoffing the Rock of their salvation
Following after strange gods
Sacrificing to demons
Isaiah 1:4, 7-11, 15-17; 3:8-9; 13:19-20 Unfaithfulness
Hypocrisy
Iniquity
Violence
Bloodshed
Evildoing
Oppressing the helpless
Haughtiness
Pride in sinfulness
Jeremiah 23:14-15; 49:16-18; 50:39-40 Adultery
Walking in lies
Strengthening the hands of evildoers
Promoting ungodliness
Inspiring terror
Pride
Idolatry
Sinning against the Lord
Challenging the Lord
Defying the Lord
Arrogance
Lamentations 3:34-36; 4:6 Transgressions
Grievous sin
Uncleanness
Rebelliousness
Iniquity
Becoming cruel
Injustice that exploits human rights
Ezekiel 16:46-51 Abominations
Whorings with heathen nations
Idolatry
Child sacrifice
Wickedness
Lewd behavior
Spiritual adultery
Lust
Shedding blood
Pride
Greed
Gluttony
No concern for the poor and needy
Amos 4:11 Ruthless oppression and enslavement of the poor
Fathers and sons sexually using the same girl
Interfering with the Nazirites and prophets
Oppression
Wrongdoing, looting, hoarding plunder
Idle luxury
Oppressing the poor and crushing the needy
Drunkenness
Making sacrifices without turning from sin and then boasting about it
Zephaniah 2:8-11 Idolatry
Complacency
Sinning against the Lord
Pride
Scoffing
Boasting
Matthew 10:14-15; 11:20-24 Hardheartedness
Unrepentance
Luke 10:5-12; 17:28-33 Inhospitality
Romans 9:29 Unbelief
2 Peter 2:4-9 NIV Ungodliness
Depravity
Lawlessness
Jude 5-7 NASB Gross immorality
Going after “strange flesh” (angelic)—violating God’s created order
Revelation 11:7-8 Rejecting God’s messengers
3 Maccabees 2:2-5 CEB Violence
Arrogance
Wicked deeds
2 Esdras 2:8-9 CEB; 5:7 CEB; 7:106 CEB Ignoring the Lord and his advice
Disobedience
Idolatry
Sexual immorality
Sirach 16:8 CEB Disobedience
Rebellion
Pride
Arrogance
Wisdom 19:13-17 CEB Failing to welcome sojourning strangers
Making guests and benefactors slaves
Treating people unlike themselves as enemies
Forcing strangers to do hard labor

The chief sins are inhospitality, idolatry, hatred of strangers, and abuses against human rights. Sexual sins are in the minority, most are metaphorical of spiritual adultery, and homosexuality is not mentioned. Instead, pride and arrogance are primary.

Next time, we’ll make some conclusions about the teaching of the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.

More information:

The Sin of Sodom coverTo read the full story, get my book, The Sin of Sodom: What the Bible Really Says About Why God Destroyed the Cities of the Plain, for Kindle and in trade paperback.

Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah

Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah

The Sodom Series, #14

When Lot and his daughters reach the safety of Zoar, destruction comes. How were the cities of the Plain destroyed?

24 Then the Lord rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the Lord out of heaven;
25 and he overthrew those cities, and all the Plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and what grew on the ground.
26 But Lot’s wife, behind him, looked back, and she became a pillar of salt.
–Genesis 19:24–26 NRSV

In nearly forty instances of the word rain in the Bible, it “is never to be taken for granted by mankind; it comes from the hand of God… in amounts proportionate to the spiritual condition of the inhabitants of that land” (TWOT, 1187).

In this instance, the Lord rained down not water, but “sulfur and fire… out of heaven.”

Upon the wicked He will rain coals; fire and brimstone and a burning wind shall be the portion of their cup.
–Psalm 11:6 NKJV

The word sulfur (brimstone in the KJV) is the Hebrew goprît (Strong’s, H1614), which occurs seven times in the Old Testament. (See Deuteronomy 29:23; Job 18:15; Psalm 11:6; Isaiah 30:33; 34:9; Ezekiel 38:22.)

The word goprît is a foreign loan word, most likely derived from Akkadian ki/ubritu, which means sulfurous oil (black sulfur) (Gentry 1999). The word accompanying goprît, wc es, simply means “and fire.” In other words, the material that fell on Sodom and Gomorrah and the Cities of the Plain (except Zoar) was a burning petroleum product. (Wood, Bryant G. “Discovery of the Sin Cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, The.” 16 Apr. 2008. Associates for Biblical Research (biblearchaeology.org). Web. 05 July 2015. .).

What was the fire? The word esh is used in Job 1:16, where it may indicate lightning: “While he was still speaking, another came and said, ‘The fire of God fell from heaven and burned up the sheep and the servants, and consumed them; I alone have escaped to tell you.’” Lightning alone seems unlikely in the Genesis 19 account.

The sulfur, or brimstone, was a burning petroleum product. Genesis 14:10 mentions pits of bitumen, a petroleum product similar to asphalt that “was commonly found in the shallow southern basin of the Dead Sea in antiquity” (Wood).

Natural gas and sulfur, which normally accompany bitumen and petroleum, are also present. These combustible materials could have been forced from the earth by subterranean pressure brought about by an earthquake resulting from the shifting of the bounding faults (Clapp 1936a: 906; 1936b: 40). Geologists who have studied the area in recent times agree with Clapp’s reconstruction (Harris and Beardow 1995: 360; Neev and Emery 1995: 13–14; 33, 37). If lightning or surface fires ignited these combustibles as they came spewing forth from the ground, it would indeed result in a holocaust such as described in Genesis 19. It is significant to note that both Bab edh-Dhra [Sodom] and Numeira [Gomorrah] lie at the edge of the plain, exactly on the eastern fault line! (Wood, emphasis mine)

Abraham, who interceded before the Lord for the deliverance of the cities of the Plain, witnessed the disappointing destruction.

27 Abraham went early in the morning to the place where he had stood before the Lord;
28 and he looked down toward Sodom and Gomorrah and toward all the land of the Plain and saw the smoke of the land going up like the smoke of a furnace.
29 So it was that, when God destroyed the cities of the Plain, God remembered Abraham, and sent Lot out of the midst of the overthrow, when he overthrew the cities in which Lot had settled.
–Genesis 19:27–29 NRSV

Abraham saw smoke rising from the Plain, keqitor hakkibsan, like smoke jetting from a kibsan, a pottery kiln (Wood).

Smoke rising from the Plain below the Dead Sea would have been visible from Hebron. Abraham’s description “fits the theory of a conflagration of petroleum products, for such a conflagration would result in a thick black smoke being forced into the sky by the heat and pressure of the burning materials shooting out of the fissure in the earth” (Wood).

This ends the Genesis 19 account of the destruction of the cities of the Plain.

But we cannot form conclusions about the meaning of this account and the reason God overthrew these cities from this passage alone, for Sodom, Gomorrah, and the other cities are mentioned throughout the Bible in both the Old and New Testaments.

Let’s explore those passages and discover more—next time.

More information:

The Sin of Sodom coverTo read the full story, get my book, The Sin of Sodom: What the Bible Really Says About Why God Destroyed the Cities of the Plain, for Kindle and in trade paperback.

Lot and Family Rescued from Sodom

Lot Flees Sodom

The Sodom Series, #13

We left Lot standing outside his door in Sodom, arguing with a violent mob that’s trying to break down the door.

What happens next?

10 But the men [angels] inside reached out their hands and brought Lot into the house with them, and shut the door.
11 And they struck with blindness the men who were at the door of the house, both small and great, so that they were unable to find the door.
–Genesis 19:10–11 NRSV

The angels rescue Lot and strike the mob with sudden blindness.

Again, the word for men here is enôsh, “a mortal, people in general” (Strong’s, H582), both small, qâtân, “little, young” (Strong’s, H6996), and great, gadôl, “older” (Strong’s, H1419)—all the citizens who had gathered from every part of the city (Gen. 19:4 KJV).

Lot’s future sons-in-laws left behind

12 Then the men said to Lot, “Have you anyone else here? Sons-in-law, sons, daughters, or anyone you have in the city—bring them out of the place.
13 For we are about to destroy this place, because the outcry against its people has become great before the Lord, and the Lord has sent us to destroy it.”
14 So Lot went out and said to his sons-in-law, who were to marry his daughters, “Up, get out of this place; for the Lord is about to destroy the city.” But he seemed to his sons-in-law to be jesting.
–Genesis 19:12–14 NRSV

There is no record of Lot having sons, but his virgin daughters were both betrothed.

Lot “went out,” meaning he left the house and went to the homes of his sons-in-law. Note that they were not part of the mob outside his door that was struck blind.

Although he told them plainly what was about to happen, they unfortunately did not believe him (righteousness believes in faith) and failed to heed his warning to flee the city.

15 When morning dawned, the angels urged Lot, saying, “Get up, take your wife and your two daughters who are here, or else you will be consumed in the punishment of the city.”
16 But he lingered; so the men seized him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand, the Lord being merciful to him, and they brought him out and left him outside the city.
17 When they had brought them outside, they said, “Flee for your life; do not look back or stop anywhere in the Plain; flee to the hills, or else you will be consumed.”
–Genesis 19:15–17 NRSV

Some hours have passed since the beginning of the trouble, for dawn comes. The angels must urge Lot to take his wife and daughters away.

Yet they hesitate, so the angels seize them by the hand and lead them outside the city walls. They advise Lot to flee to the mountains without looking back.

Lot and family flee south to Zoar instead

18 And Lot said to them, “Oh, no, my lords;
19 your servant has found favor with you, and you have shown me great kindness in saving my life; but I cannot flee to the hills, for fear the disaster will overtake me and I die.
20 Look, that city is near enough to flee to, and it is a little one. Let me escape there—is it not a little one?—and my life will be saved!”
21 He said to him, “Very well, I grant you this favor too, and will not overthrow the city of which you have spoken.
22 Hurry, escape there, for I can do nothing until you arrive there.” Therefore the city was called Zoar.
23 The sun had risen on the earth when Lot came to Zoar.
–Genesis 19:18–23 NRSV

Although ten righteous people in Sodom could not be found (see Gen. 18:32), the Lord nonetheless delivers Lot and his wife and daughters before destroying the cities of the Plain.

Lot fears fleeing to the hills, so he is permitted to escape to Zoar instead. When they reach this little town south of Sodom and Gomorrah, destruction comes.

More next time.

More information:

To read the full story, get my book, The Sin of Sodom: What the Bible Really Says About Why God Destroyed the Cities of the Plain, for Kindle and in trade paperback.
The Sin of Sodom cover